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Chef Shim Brings Korean Food to NYC Wine & Food Festival

Chef Shim Brings Korean Food to NYC Wine & Food Festival



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Chef Sungchul Shim taught eager crowds about the great depth of Korean cuisine at the Grand Tasting event at the 2014 NYCWFF

Chef Shim prepares plates of his perfect pork belly at the Grand Tasting.

Chef Sungchul Shim wants to show the world how diverse and delicious Korean food can be.

Shim knew he was destined to become a chef while in high school in Korea, and after graduating from The Culinary Institute of America in 2006 he worked in some of this country’s best restaurants, including Le Bernardin and Per Se in New York. Now the executive chef of Neta in the West Village, Shim fuses the tastes of his upbringing, the fresh, classic ingredients of sushi, and his masterful French technique to give guests a dining experience the likes of which they have probably never had before.

Chef Shim partnered with the Korean Food Foundation at the Grand Tasting event on Saturday and Sunday of the New York City Food & Wine Festival. There he served succulent pork belly that had been braised for six hours with fried lotus root chip, pickled greens, and a very complex ssamjang sauce. He incorporated his classic French training by sweating the onions and garlic for two hours before adding them to the sauce, which further deepened the flavors of the dish.

“Many Korean chefs like to use French technique to make a pretty plate,” said Shim, “but it has to taste good, too.” When asked to identify his favorite part of the Grand Tasting, the chef replied, “I like the opportunity it gives me show the depth and adaptability of Korean cuisine.”

Kate Kolenda is the Restaurant and City Guide Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @BeefWerky and @theconversant.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


TableConversation.com

All you can eat barbecues in Koreatown are fantastic, if you want to eat as much meat as possible. But at some restaurants, one of the best tastes comes after the meat is gone and the grill is empty.  Then the server brings the makings for kimchi fried rice.

In the photo at the top, you can see how it's put together at Hae Jang Chon on West 6th Street. 



But you don't have to eat out to get kimchi fried rice. It's easy to make at home. All you need is  kimchi and rice that has been cooked previously so that it's not too soft.

If you don't eat a lot of kimchi, you may not want to purchase the large jars stocked in Korean markets. However, those same markets have delis where you can buy any amount you need. 

The version in the photo above gets added flavor from bacon, but you could saute with butter or oil instead and leave the rice meatless. Or you could put in a small amount of meat for richer flavor.

The rice in the photo is topped with a seasoned dry seaweed snack from a Korean market. Crisp, lightly sweetened and sprinkled with sesame seeds, it's great for garnishing and also for snacking, either by itself or as an accompaniment to beer--Korean beer, of course. 

KIMCHI FRIED RICE

1/3 cup chopped bacon
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 green onions, including some of the tops, chopped
1 heaping cup cabbage kimchi, chopped
2 1/2 cups previously cooked rice
Salt if needed
Korean seasoned dry seaweed, optional 

Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the bacon and cook until browned and the fat has melted. Add the garlic and green onions and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the kimchi and cook until heated through.

Add the rice and toss until heated through and evenly mixed with the kimchi so that no white grains remain.  Taste and add salt if needed. Serve sprinkled with the seaweed, if desired.


Watch the video: Roy Yamaguchi on chefs at the 2014 Hawaii Food and Wine Festival (August 2022).