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3 Great Après-Ski Food Stops


Skiing up a storm? Stop for food afterward at these three locations

If you’re skiing in Park City or Aspen, make sure to stop by one of these three eateries. The menus, atmospheres, and views are all worth a visit.

Planning your annual ski trip this winter? Exercise and cold temperatures are bound to make you hungry, and if you’re in Park City or Aspen, that inevitable feeling should lead you right to one of these three après-ski stops.

Ajax Tavern

Spending your ski trip in Aspen? For incredible post-ski food, look no further than Ajax Tavern on Aspen Mountain. You’ll enjoy a great atmosphere with even greater views. The menu includes items like truffle fries with parsley, mac and cheese with herb-toasted breadcrumbs, and a power greens and beets salad.

Atticus

At the base of Park City Mountain in Park City, Utah, lies Atticus, an après-ski stop with a warming atmosphere. Coffee, tea, sandwiches, and used books are sold here — it’s the perfect place to go and relax after skiing with friends.

Stein Eriksen Lodge Deer Valley

Fireplace? Check. Incredible views? Check. Garlic cheese fries? Check. This Park City hotel’s restaurant serves amazing food, and it’s perfect for a delicious lunch after skiing your heart out. Don’t pass up a burger here — they’re known to be incredible.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


What is après-ski, exactly?

Après-ski is a French term that translates literally to “after ski” or “after skiing.” The phrase, made popular in the Alps during the 1950s rise of commercial skiing, is defined by Oxford Living Dictionaries as “the social activities and entertainment following a day’s skiing.” Today, après-ski provides an umbrella term for popular post-ski activities it can refer to everything from champagne toasts on slopeside terraces in Chamonix, France, to craft beers around ski lodge fire pits in Aspen, Colorado.

There’s no official timeframe for “après ski,” though it usually starts in late afternoon—say, around 4 p.m. after the “last run” of the day (pro tip: never call it your last run, it’s bad luck)— and can keep going well past dinner. Nightclubs in Austria have been known to crank until 6 a.m. While après-ski customs and culture vary from place to place—some ski resorts are more upscale while others have generally laid-back vibes—it’s common for your snow gear to double as après-ski attire, minus those clunky ski boots. Don’t worry, you won’t have to add extra getups to your ski trip packing list. Swap your helmet for a beanie, stow your boards and skis away, and embrace the local habits with the help of this guide. You can even après-ski at home. This is 2020, after all.

Written by Jessie Beck, Sarah Buder, Lyndsey Matthews, and Laura Dannen Redman.


Watch the video: Apres Ski Hits Mix 2020 - über 1 h Party Nonstop - mixed by DJ Mitch (January 2022).