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DineL.A. and Newport Restaurant Week Make Southern California a Food Destination

DineL.A. and Newport Restaurant Week Make Southern California a Food Destination



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Winter dineL.A. and Newport Restaurant Week are coinciding, enabling Angelinos to enjoy great restaurant deals throughout both cities.

Winter dineL.A. is in full swing until Jan. 27, celebrating the city’s rich culinary diversity and featuring more than 300 restaurants throughout Los Angeles from newcomers such as Geoffrey Zakarian’s Georgie, Greg Bernhardt’s Paley, and Tony Esnault’s Spring to timeless spots including Wolfgang Puck’s Spago, Suzanne Goin’s Lucques, and Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken’s Border Grill. Additional participants include well-known restaurants including Alimento, Akasha, Cut by Wolfgang Puck, Sugarfish, and a.o.c.

Back by popular demand, the Exclusive Series, presented by American Express, offers diners a chance to enjoy some of LA’s most luxurious restaurants including as Providence, Melissé and Patina. Visit the dineL.A. website to book reservations.

Diners can eat their way through the city’s diverse neighborhoods and cuisines with Winter dineL.A’s specially priced lunch and dinner menus. Lunch menus are $15, $20, and $25, with dinner menus priced at $29, $39, and $49, or beginning at $95 for the Exclusive Series. Enjoy additional savings through American Express by signing up and using an AmEx card at participating restaurants to receive $5 off a final bill of $21 or more.

DineL.A. guests can also share their culinary experiences at participating restaurants with the returning “Dine. Snap. Win.” Instagram contest sponsored by American Airlines. Diners simply snap a photo of their dineL.A. dish, use the hashtag #DineSnapWin, and include the restaurant name to be entered into the contest where one winner will receive 100,000 American Airlines AAdvantage miles. Contest is valid through the dates of Winter dineL.A.

In addition to dineL.A., more than 60 restaurants are taking part in Newport Restaurant Week, which runs through Sunday, Jan. 29. Participating restaurants are offering special two-or three-course prix fixes priced between $10 and $25 for lunch, and $20 to $50 for dinner.

This year’s participating restaurants include newcomers Benihana, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, Gratitude Newport Beach, Hornblower Cruisers and Events, Juliette Kitchen and Bar, Lighthouse Bayview Café, Mr. G’s Bistro, Sessions Westcoast Deli, Sweet Lady Jane, and Zinc.

Celebrating its 11th anniversary this year, Newport Beach Restaurant Week, produced by Dine Newport Beach and Newport Beach Restaurant Association, is a citywide two-week dining event showcasing the coastal community’s restaurants. Holding the title as the longest-running restaurant week in Orange County, the annual culinary festival has grown to incorporate a wide variety of restaurants offering preferred menu pricing for lunch and dinner. For more information and a full list of participants, visit their website.


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


Newport restaurant week warms up

Restaurateurs, purveyors and chefs gathered this week for the launch party of the first Newport Beach Restaurant Week — which is scheduled to start Jan. 21 — and help the city’s adopted Marine battalion, the 1st Battalion, 1st Marines.

Tuesday night’s “launch party for the most part is a huge celebration for all of us. We’re so happy that this is happening,” Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. spokeswoman Peggy Fort said Tuesday. “The evening is really a combination of officially launching restaurant week … but also a chance to thank our sponsors, community partners and raise some funds for the Camp Pendleton Marines and their families.”

Newport Beach Restaurant Week has generated buzz for months, and Fort said many residents have called her and participating restaurants to get the scoop.

“Any time you do a first-time campaign, there are a lot of questions,” Fort said. “Overall, the restaurants have been very, very excited, and we’ve been getting a lot of calls already.”

Restaurant Week came to fruition after some research by local restaurateurs. Other cities in the country have had similar successful events for some time, and Newport Beach restaurant owners thought it could be successful here too, Fort said.

From Jan. 21 through 25, about 70 restaurants in the city will offer a three-course, fixed-price menu for lunch or dinner or both. Lunch will cost $12.95, dinner $26.95 — a good price for both restaurant owner and diner, said Arches owner and Newport Beach Restaurant Assn. President Dan Marcheano.

“It’s a neat way for the whole restaurant to celebrate with locals,” said the association’s vice president Sherry Drewry, whose mother owns Wilma’s Patio on Balboa Island. “I don’t think anybody will be disappointed.”

After paying a $150 fee, each restaurant was given creative license to come up with a menu that worked for them. Marcheano is offering lunch and dinner at the Arches, with each main course sandwiched by a Caesar salad and cherries jubilee. For lunch, the Arches will feature a chicken piccata, sand dabs, hamburger or meatloaf and for dinner, customers can order sand dabs, filet and another chicken item.

Having the event at the end of January was strategic, coming at a time when Newport Beach restaurants are traditionally slower than others, Marcheano said.

“It gives the consumer a great opportunity to get out there to restaurants they haven’t been to or have kind of forgotten about,” Marcheano said.

Despite netting a bit less money than perhaps they would otherwise, Marcheano said he’s told his peers to consider participation as another form of advertising, something he said restaurant owners are accustomed to doing anyway.

More than touting Newport as a “dining destination” — promotional materials have been sent throughout Southern California, particularly in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach — the week serves the diner. Not often can you get a three-course meal at a restaurant like the Ritz, the Arches or Bayside Restaurant at the restaurant week’s fixed prices.

Less expensive eateries have other deals to make the price worthwhile, like two-for-one deals or wine pairings, Fort said.

“I think it’s the start of, hopefully, a very successful annual campaign,” Fort said. “And I think there’s a lot of restaurants — if for some reason [they] didn’t sign up this year — that will want to get on board for next year.”


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